Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Some carsharing optimism

I have often been a carsharing optimist.

But I am also often frustrated at the seemingly slow rise of the industry. In Singapore (where I live) for example, carsharing faced decline over several years, although it may now be reviving.

So it has been nice to see a spurt of carsharing good news recently.

First, news from Germany's Bundesverband CarSharing via Dave Brook on twitter that carsharing continues to boom in Germany. Most strikingly, there is spectacular growth in one-way carsharing (the dark blue columns). Dave writes the Carsharing.US blog.



And today I see that a recent report by business advisory firm AlixPartners suggests a much larger than expected effect of carsharing on car purchases, at least in the leading USA cities for carsharing.
According to the study, which surveyed 1,000 licensed drivers in 10 developed metropolitan car-sharing markets in the U.S. and 1,000 drivers nationally as a control sample, car sharing in the 10 key markets appears to be displacing vehicle purchases at a rate of 32 to 1 (one car-sharing fleet vehicle displacing 32 vehicles that would have otherwise been purchased). That’s more than double the rate of many studies that have focused only on national averages. To date, according to the AlixPartners study, approximately 500,000 vehicle purchases nationally have been avoided due to car sharing. In addition, the study suggests that as car sharing grows in popularity, it could account for approximately 1.2 million more purchases avoided through 2020.

Finally, here is a slideshow offering great clarity on the various 'shared-use mobility options' and how they might come together as a coherent alternative to owning a car (something I have enthused about before).





Friday, November 29, 2013

Singapore public transport - historical perspective on current issues

This post is to share a presentation on Singapore's Public Transport policies which I gave in Seoul in September.

This is my own take on the story, not any kind of official narrative. I took a rather long-term perspective, going back to the 1930s and emphasizing important changes in the 1970s. It is also a 'big picture' view. But some of the current debates are also there.

If you have any interest in Singapore's public transport story, then take a peek and let me know what you think.



If you can't see the embedded slideshow above, then try clicking Public Transport Policy in Singapore (a long view) 

By the way, Singapore has had a busy year of transport and urban planning announcements.

Early in the year, there was the controversial Population White Paper. That was followed closely by the Land Use Plan (basically the latest Concept Plan, Singapore's strategic plan that comes out roughly every ten years).

Later in the year came the Land Transport Master Plan 2013 (an update of the 2008 plan). Now the Draft Master Plan 2013 is out. The Master Plans make concrete the visions in the Concept Plans.

The Seoul event was the 3rd International Public Transportation Forum organized by the Korea Transport Insitute (KOTI).

I should also acknowledge the LTA as the source of some of the images in the presentation.

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Attention newly motorizing cities! Look to NEW Transit Metropolises!


This diagram is from a new presentation (see below) in which I make the following claims:
  1. "New Transit Cities" are especially relevant for newly motorizing cities (such as India’s cities)
  2. Cities that are now New Transit Cities were, in the past, faced with challenging circumstances similar to those facing India’s cities today (namely a flood of vehicles causing traffic saturation at a time when they lacked significant mass transit that was immune from traffic)
  3. After flirting with accommodating cars, the New Transit Cities all resisted the idea that cars are a necessity and acted to make sure cars remained optional. 
Please take a look and tell me what you think in the comments. Let me know about any corrections or omissions. Do you agree?

If you can't see the embedded SlideShare version below, then download the presentation from the CSE India website (7MB pdf).



By the way, I presented this in Delhi last week at the invitation of the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE India) for their workshop on 'Transport and Climate'. Day 2 on July 25 was on "Designing cities for sustainable mobility".

While in Delhi I also conducted a half day training workshop on parking policy. I will report on that over at Reinventing Parking.

Many thanks to CSE India and GIZ's SUTP for making the trip possible.

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